More Women Than We Thought Have Babies With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: You might want to rethink that drink

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

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Drinking while pregnant could be doing more harm than anyone has previously believed. According to Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), one in every 13 women who consumes alcohol while expecting will have a baby born with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

CAMH’s findings, which were published in JAMA Pediatrics on Monday, analyzed 24 existing studies of more than 1,400 children to determine how prevalent FASD is in kids aged 0 to 16 around the world. Globally, they found that nearly eight in 1,000 babies are born with the disorder.

“FASD prevalence estimates are essential to effectively prioritize and plan health care for children with FASD, who are often misdiagnosed,” said Dr. Svetlana Popova, Senior Scientist at CAMH’s Institute for Mental Health Policy Research. “Most of these children will require lifelong care, so the earlier they have access to appropriate therapy and supports, the better their long-term health…

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Training: Understanding Addiction

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

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Promoting Healthy Relationships and Supportive Environments

Overview

Understanding Addiction is an online learning program that seeks to equip non-specialist workers and volunteers with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to confidently help people who face challenges with substance use and addiction. The goal of this course is to ensure that anyone in a “helping role” will be able to foster healthy relationships and build supportive environments.

Participants will engage in eight interactive online lessons that feature opportunities for personal reflection, downloadable resources, and a facilitated forum. They will learn about topics such as: the factors behind addiction and control, the dynamics involved in helping people change their behaviour, and what to do in difficult situations. Participants will also have opportunities to practice skills that enhance client engagement while promoting safety.

This program has been developed by the Canadian Mental Health Association BC Division (CMHA BC) in partnership with BC Non-Profit Housing Association…

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Partnership aims to reduce alcohol harms on Canadian campuses

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

College-Drinking

Thirty-six universities and colleges have teamed up with the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction and Universities Canada in an effort to curb high-risk drinking. The Postsecondary Partnership – Alcohol Harms (PEP-AH), as it’s called, is connecting students and administrators with health experts to create campus programs to reduce harms related to binge drinking.

While Canadian universities have individually been grappling with the issue for decades, this partnership represents a more collaborative approach, said Scott Duguay, co-chair of PEP-AH and associate vice-president, enrolment management, at St. Thomas University. “We’re offering resources and ideas and best practices but allowing a lot of space for individual members to build their own plans,” Mr. Duguay said. “We strongly encourage institutions that are partners to have a campus team that oversees alcohol harm reduction programming.”

A 2016 survey of 43,780 students from 41 Canadian campuses affirmed the challenges institutions face with the prevalence…

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Fathers and alcohol consumption during pregnancy

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

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Alcohol consumption during preconception and pregnancy is generally considered to be the prospective mother’s responsibility, with many current international alcohol policy guidelines recommending the reduction or non-use of alcohol by pregnant women. However, research suggests that decisions about alcohol use can often be influenced by others, in particular the prospective father.

The National Drug Research Institute did research on the father’s involvement in alcohol exposed pregnancies. This study was initiated due to factors such as; the Australian Alcohol Guidelines, and ‘mothers guilt’. Interestingly, over the past decade the guidelines have changed the recommendations for women’s alcohol consumption during pregnancy from 2 standard drinks per day to no consumption being the safest option. The responsibility has been solely pressed on women and have not focused heavily enough on the social determinants that support the consumption of alcohol during pregnancy.

The findings of the research identified that 75% of women who do…

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Honouring Jordan’s Principle

Honouring Jordan’s Principle is a report outlining the obstacles to accessing equitable health and social services for First Nations children with special healthcare needs living in Pinaymootang, Manitoba. Pinaymootang is a First Nations community about 220km north of Winnipeg.

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Jordan’s Principle is a child first principle intended to ensure that First Nations children do not experience denials, delays, or disruptions of public services ordinarily available to other children because of jurisdictional disputes between different levels of government or between departments within the same level of government. See here for more information.

In 2015, Pinaymootang First Nation partnered with McGill University to document the experience of Pinaymootang First Nation families and service providers in accessing services for children with special needs. Although the report did not specifically address children with FASD, estimates on the prevalence of FASD in northern Canadian communities range from 7.0 to 189.7 per 1,000 people (pg 28 –…

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