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Building the right mobile app for caregivers of children with FASD

The FASD Prevention Conversation Project

fea-Tapparello-PetrenkoMt. Hope Family Center research associate Christie Petrenko, left, and electrical and computer engineering research associate Cristiano Tapparello have won a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support their work to develop a mobile app to provide health information for self-directed and peer-to-peer interventions for parents and caregivers of children with fetal alcohol syndrome disorder. (University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster)

After years of working with patients and researching fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), Christie Petrenko, a research associate at the University’s Mt. Hope Family Center, knew a mobile app might be just the tool she was missing in order to help families and caregivers of children with FASD. She wasn’t sure who might have the right technical expertise but knew fellow psychology researchers had forged connections with colleagues at the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Soon, she was introduced…

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Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention – A response to TRC Call-to-Action #33

The FASD Prevention Conversation Project

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Five new booklets on Indigenous Approaches to FASD Prevention have just been published. They were developed  following the Dialogue to Action on Prevention of FASD meeting in May 2017, and reflect the 8 tenets of the Consensus Statement created by participants for enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Call-to-Action #33:

“We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.” – Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

The booklets were written by Tasnim Nathoo and Nancy Poole of the Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health in collaboration with the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, and Canada FASD Research Network. Topics include: Brief Interventions with Girls and Women,

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Ready or Not: Mental Health and Stress

The FASD Prevention Conversation Project

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Everyone feels worried, sad or stressed at times. Very high levels of stress can affect your ability to conceive a baby. Developing babies exposed to high levels of stress may develop problems later in life. If you’re concerned about your worrying, sadness or stress speak with your health care provider. There are many things you can do that can help.

Stress is the emotional, mental and physical strain that happens when something changes in the world around you.

It could be a new job, moving, loss of a family member or friend or a change in finances.

Some stress is positive. It challenges you to try something new or learn how to do something you haven’t done before.

However, high levels of stress or stress that lasts a long time can have negative health effects.

Learn more about stress here.

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FREE FASD Webcast

learningseriesbannerRegister now for the February 21, 2018, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Webcast

Join us for this free webcast entitled: Supporting Employment Success in Adults with FASD.

Securing and maintaining employment for persons with FASD can be challenging.  In this webinar, our presenters will discuss what employment success looks like for persons with FASD, which includes:

  • Sharing findings, including survey responses and video footage, from the CanFASD study “Supporting Employment Success in Adults with FASD”
  • Presenting the preliminary evaluation tool guide for guiding employment professionals in their work with adults with FASD
  • Explaining the prompts for evaluating a client’s well-being and factors for preparing for, obtaining and maintaining employment

This webinar will be of interest to persons directly affected by FASD, employers and anyone else supporting persons with FASD.

AGENDA:
Date:
Wednesday, February 21, 2018
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. MST
Speakers: Dr. Marnie Makela and Aamena Kapasi

Register Here
Format: Presenters with PowerPoint Presentation
Cost: FREE! Please share with your networks
Q&A: You can pose questions to the speakers through the live chat functionality. Remember, the live webcasts are interactive and we encourage you to participate in the question and answer portions by typing questions for speakers in the chat window, which is located below the main video panel on the webcast page.

SPEAKER BIOS
Dr. Marnie Makela is a registered psychologist in Edmonton and researcher with the Canada FASD Research Network. She focuses her clinical and research work on children, youth and young adults who are presenting with learning, behavioural and mental health concerns related to FASD and other developmental disabilities. She also provides consultation for families of children with complex disabilities, such as FASD, who require a combination of individual therapy for their child and assistance with supports at home, school and other environments.

Aamena Kapasi is a PhD student at the University of Alberta in the School and Clinical Child Psychology program. Aamena has a passion for working with children and youth, and her research interests include supports and interventions for individuals with FASD.

Previous webcasts are available on the CSS Learning Series Website.

THE FASD LEARNING SERIES:
The FASD Learning Series helps individuals, caregivers, front-line workers and professionals learn more about FASD, and how to support persons with FASD. The educational sessions cover a broad range of topics and are accessible to all Albertans.

Alberta’s FASD 10-Year Strategic Plan outlines the government’s commitment to provide awareness and prevention of FASD, as well as assessment, diagnosis, and support for individuals with FASD and their caregivers. All services and activities are built on a foundation of stakeholder engagement