INTEGRATED SERVICE DELIVERY IN FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER (FASD): A REVIEW OF THE ALBERTA FASD SERVICE NETWORK MODEL

Flannigan, Katherine R., Wrath, Andrew J., McFarlane, Audrey, Murphy, Lisa, & Rogozinsky, Lisa. (2021). Integrated Service Delivery in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): A Review of the Alberta FASD Service Network Model. Journal on Developmental Disabilities, 26(2). https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5711239

Abstract

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disabilities in North America. Stemming from the brain- and body-based impacts of prenatal alcohol exposure, individuals with FASD experience a range of challenges with physical, cognitive, behavioural, and social-emotional functioning. Most individuals with FASD require ongoing assistance to support day-to-day living and protect against negative life outcomes. Service needs for individuals with FASD often span across multiple areas of functioning, necessitating a range of supports from various disciplines and sectors. The complexity of needs experienced by individuals with FASD underscores the importance of integrated services, however, there is currently a lack of research on integrated service delivery approaches in the FASD population. The Alberta FASD Service Network model is a unique integrated FASD service delivery approach established in 2007 which facilitates the delivery of coordinated FASD supports and programs across Alberta. The aim of the current study was to review the evidence pertaining to this model. We identified 45 relevant documents, the findings of which were synthesized to better understand the aims and scope, impacts, and challenges of the Alberta FASD Service Network model and inform future work in FASD research, practice, and policy. V26-N2-21-351-Flannigan-et-al-v3Download

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