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Family Education Society:

Please see the attached posters as a reminder of the programs the Family Education Society is currently offering. Baby and Me occurs on Fridays and there is still room! Dad’s Discover starts next week and we still have 2 more Lunch & Learns available in April.

Walk and Talk occurs every Thursday, participants must register as they need to ensure numbers are kept to AHS outdoor guidelines and masks are mandatory.

For more information contact:

Gaitane Gilje

https://www.familyeducationsociety.org/

Ph. 780-830-0920

Fx. 780-830-0921

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Upcoming ASIST Training

SPRC have had some openings come available for our upcoming Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) workshop next week.

There are 3 spots available on a first come first serve basis. Visit their website to register: https://www.sp-rc.ca/workshop-registration

SPRC have also opened up addition summer training dates. If you’re interested in learning more or taking this training visit their website at https://www.sp-rc.ca/workshops/applied-suicide-intervention-skills-training-asist

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION ON UPDATING CANADA’S LOW-RISK ALCOHOL DRINKING GUIDELINES CLOSES ON APRIL 18, 2021

Dear colleague,

Thousands of people in Canada have already shared their views about alcohol during our public consultation on updating Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines. On behalf of all of us at the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA), we want to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has taken part so far. Your views matter to us!

If you have not yet had your say, there’s still time. The online consultation survey is open to all people in Canada until April 18. The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete, depending on how much input you choose to provide.

We want to hear from as many people as possible and ensure that we receive a broad range of perspectives related to alcohol and alcohol consumption. This includes members of the public, as well as professionals from a variety of sectors, including health and social services, health research, education and industry.

The feedback we receive through this consultation will inform the update to the Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines. It will help us learn about the experiences of the general public and stakeholders with the current guidelines and their needs and expectations for updated guidelines, namely:

  • Whether and how people in Canada are using the current alcohol drinking guidelines;
  • What are some of the challenges in using the guidelines;
  • What is most useful in the guidelines; and
  • What your needs and expectations are for the updated guidelines.

Should you decide to take part, rest assured that your information is completely confidential and anonymous.

Want to know more about this public consultation? Visit CCSA’s website or see our Frequently Asked Questions.

If you have any questions about this project, please email Lauren Levett, (LLevett@ccsa.ca).

Retrieved from Public Consultation on Updating Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines Closes on April 18, 2021 (preventionconversation.org)

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CANFASD COMMON MESSAGES: GUIDELINES FOR WRITING AND TALKING ABOUT FASD

CanFASD has updated their common messages guide! A great resource to refer to when you’re talking about FASD, alcohol, and pregnancy. Check it out!

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2021-04-13-at-6.45.18-PM.png
Click here to download the guide.

Common-Messages-EN-1Download

The purpose of this document is to assist those writing and talking about FASD – and the issues related to the disability – to use the same language, statistics, and framing of topics. The intended outcome, over time, will be an improved understanding by the reader/listener with consistent and respectful FASD messaging.

This is a living document and areas will be updated as they are informed by emerging research.
Key Communication Themes:

The following are some overarching recommendations for all messaging about FASD:

1. Respect, dignity, and inherent human worth should be promoted among individuals with FASD, women who use alcohol during pregnancy, and their families:

o FASD awareness or prevention programs and initiatives should avoid guilt-ridden, blameful, or shameful messaging
o When using imagery, refrain from using pictures of fetuses, pregnant bellies without heads, and naked pregnant people
o Fatalistic or deficits-focused terminology should be replaced with person-first, strength-based, and hope-focused language (see the definition below)
o These language guides provide additional context and information about dignity promotion for individuals with FASD

2. Always rely on information that is accurate and based on rigorous, high-quality research (i.e., evidence-based)

3. Refrain from stating that FASD is “100% preventable” as this statement greatly oversimplifies the issue and can stigmatize individuals and families

In order to promote a common language about FASD and to minimize misinterpretation of key issues, CanFASD has developed a standard definition of FASD. Standard definitions are needed to ensure consistency in administrative, clinical, and research operations. We recommend that this definition be used by governments and policymakers across Canada to promote accurate and consistent language when referring to FASD.

Retrieved from CanFASD COMMON MESSAGES: GUIDELINES FOR WRITING AND TALKING ABOUT FASD (preventionconversation.org)

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AHS Kids’ Klub

AHS Child & Youth Addiction and Mental Health Services is pleased to announce its next Kids’ Klub program start date for May 4, 2021.  The sessions will occur every Tuesday from 3:30 to 5:00 PM for eight consecutive weeks at our Nordic Court location (Grande Prairie).  The goal of this program is to educate and support children 7 to 12 years of age who have been negatively affected by a family member’s alcohol or substance use, gambling and/or mental health problem.  Please notify staff and colleagues alike, as you see appropriate, in effort to provide awareness to those in need of this service.

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CanFASD: The Unique Complexities of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Issue:
With an estimated 4% of individuals in Canada living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
(FASD), this disability is more common than most other neurodevelopmental disabilities
combined. However, knowledge and awareness of FASD among both the general public and
service providers continues to lag behind that of other disabilities [1-3]. FASD is a highly
complex disability. With increased knowledge of the complexities associated with FASD,
researchers, service providers, and policy makers will be better equipped to identify individuals
with FASD, support success for individuals with FASD and their families and caregivers, and
develop meaningful policy initiatives that foster well-being and positive outcomes.

The goals of this paper are to: 1) discuss contributing factors to FASD that distinguish the
disability in terms of complexity, co-occurrence, and magnitude, and 2) emphasize the
importance of adapting practice and policy approaches to account for these factors.


In this paper, we will discuss the literature related to FASD as a socially-rooted disability that
has intergenerational impacts, multiple layers of stigmatization, and high rates of mental health
comorbidities; is exacerbated by experiences of adversity across the lifespan; and presents
unique challenges for caregivers and families.

Full article can be accessed here:

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WEBINAR REGISTRATION: CCSA

Dear colleague,

Please join us for the continuation of the National Alcohol Forum: Implications of COVID-19webinar seriesOur next webinar will explore approaches that can be implemented in the community to support people living with alcohol use disorders during the pandemic.

People with substance use concerns are being disproportionately impacted by stresses related to the pandemic. Recent polling suggests that more than four in 10 people with past or current substance use disorders have been drinking more alcohol since March 2020. At the same time, many treatment and support services have moved online or adapted their in-person services to comply with pandemic restrictions.

Don’t miss this opportunity to engage with experts and learn more about alcohol-related community supports and services. Space is limited for this webinar. We encourage you to register early to secure your place as past webinars have reached capacity.

Delivering Community-based Supports for Alcohol Use Disorder During the COVID-19 Pandemic

With access to in-person care limited during the pandemic, accessible community-based supports for people living with alcohol use disorder are crucial. Managed alcohol programs (MAPs) and mobile withdrawal management support (MWMS) services have been implemented in parts of Canada. This webinar will explore how MAPs and MWMS services are providing needed supports to people during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Date: March 22, 2021, 12 p.m. – 1 p.m., EST

Register now

Speakers:

Dr. Bernie Pauly, Scientist, Associate Director, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research

Dr. Andrew Lodge, Medical Director, Klinic Community Health

Please note that this webinar will be presented in English.

Retrieved from Webinar Registration: CCSA (preventionconversation.org)

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HAVE YOUR SAY: PUBLIC CONSULTATION ON UPDATING CANADA’S LOW-RISK ALCOHOL DRINKING GUIDELINES

The Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA) is leading an exciting initiative, with support from Health Canada, to update Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines by 2022 using the latest evidence. We are holding a six weekonline public consultation to inform the update to the guidelines. The consultation survey is open to all people in Canada from March 8 until April 18. 

Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines were originally published by CCSA in November 2011 and were the result of the work of alcohol research experts in Canada. Since then, substantial new research on the association between drinking alcohol and physical, mental and social harms has been completed. Many countries, including the U.K. and Australia, have updated their guidance on drinking to reflect these advancements in what we know about the risks and benefits associated with alcohol consumption. 

We want people in Canada to have the latest advice on alcohol to support them in making informed decisions about drinking. To that end, it is important that they are involved and have the opportunity to inform how the guidelines are developed and communicated. 

The feedback we receive will help to inform the update to the Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines. It will help us learn about the experiences of the general public and stakeholders with the current guidelines and their needs and expectations for updated guidelines, namely: 

  • Whether and how Canadians are using the current alcohol drinking guidelines; 
  • What are some of the challenges in using the current guidelines; 
  • What is most useful in the current guidelines; and 
  • What your needs and expectations are for the updated guidelines.

We would be grateful if you could participate in this consultation and also share this request with your colleagues and networks. We want to hear from a number of people in Canada and ensure that we receive a broad range of perspectives related to alcohol and alcohol consumption. This includes members of the public, as well as professionals from a variety of sectors, including health and social services, health research, education and industry.

The online consultation survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete, depending on how much input you choose to provide. Should you decide to take part, rest assured that your information is completely confidential and anonymous.

Want to know more? Visit CCSA’s website or see our Frequently Asked Questions.

Retrieved from Have Your Say: Public Consultation on Updating Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines (preventionconversation.org)