Webinar Series, REGISTER- Health Promotion for Girls: Gender-Transformative Approaches

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

Date & Time: Monday June 18Time: 1:00pm ETD / 10:00AM PDT

(11:00am MDT/ 12:00pm CDT/ 2:00 pm ADT/ and 2:30 NDT)

The Presenters

Nancy Poole, Director, Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health
Marbella Carlos, Project Officer, Girls Action Foundation

This webinar will be the first of two webinars on our collaborative work to define, develop curriculum, pilot, and evaluate gender-transformative approaches to health promotion within girls’ programming. This first webinar will focus on promising practices in, and examples of, gender transformative girls’ programming. In the second webinar (to be held in the fall) we will share a new guide on this approach which has been piloted in six communities in Nova Scotia, BC, Ontario and Quebec.

We welcome all individuals and groups who are interested in girls’ group programming and girls health and wellness overall.

To register, please click https://bccewh.hostedincanadasurveys.ca/index.php/272478/lang/en/newtest/Y

The Girls Action Foundation

At Girls Action we are committed to building a…

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Journal of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Risk & Prevention

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

pageHeaderLogoImage_en_USTheJournal of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Risk & Prevention strives to serve as an international resource for scientific publications on the epidemiology, neurobiology, psychology and sociology of fetal alcohol toxicity. A strong emphasis will be placed on prevention and risk reduction. 

Message From The Editor: Tom Leibson, MD

The recent decade has fostered an amazing advancement in addiction research, yet we are still far from understanding the entire spectrum of consequences associated with fetal exposure to addictive substances and how to prevent them from happening. This knowledge gap exists despite global multi-disciplinary research and millions of dollars invested in addiction biochemistry, neurology and psychology. Cognizant of the matter, our new journal is designed to attract and showcase novel data regarding the most common teratogenic drug of abuse – alcohol.

This dedicated publication venue is not meant to replace existing journals but rather allow the community of clinicians and scientists who are…

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In The News: CBC, IUD most effective birth control method, Canadian pediatricians declare

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

Intrauterine contraception is easily the most effective method of contraception, the Canadian Paediatric Society says. (Jay Directo/AFP/Getty)

Teen girls who are sexually active should be offered long-acting birth control such as an intrauterine device (IUD) as a first line of defence, the Canadian Paediatric Society says in a new position statement.

Pediatricians reviewed the benefits and risks of each method of birth control, which they will continue to do with patients.

“We’re saying that intrauterine contraception is easily the most effective method of contraception and so you should be talking about it,” said Dr. Giosi Di Meglio, an author of the statement and a member of the society’s adolescent health committee.

An IUD is a small, often T-shaped device placed inside the uterus by a doctor, nurse practitioner or nurse to prevent pregnancy. An intrauterine system (IUS) also has a hormone component. Both work continuously over years and can be removed…

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In The News: Township trauma: the terrible cost of drinking during pregnancy (The Guardian)

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

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Mentors helped Veronic Blom stop using alcohol and crystal meth when she was pregnant with her youngest son. Photograph: Kate Hodal for the Guardian

In a dusty township in South Africa’s sun-drenched wine country, Charay Afrika says only one thing helped numb her through a turbulent relationship and two pregnancies: alcohol.

She drank all day, every day, throughout her full-term pregnancies – unaware of the effect alcohol could have on her children.

Afrika was still at school when she met her first boyfriend, a man who would go on to beat her and rob her at gunpoint multiple times before she finally escaped him. “He’d beat me and lock me in the house with no food and then disappear for days,” Afrika, 28, says quietly. “I once had to drug him with sleeping pills so that I could call the neighbours and beg for help to sneak out. But he…

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8th International Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Research, Results and Relevance

A little early to post, but the organizers of the conference are already calling for Abstracts so get yours in soon if this is of interest.

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

ubc-logo

8th International Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Research, Results, and Relevance

Integrating Research, Policy and Promising Practice Around the World

 

March 6-9, 2019


This advanced level conference/meeting continues to bring together global experts from multiple disciplines to share international research. From the pure science to prevention, diagnosis, and intervention across the lifespan, the conference will address the implications of this research and promote scientific/community collaboration. It provides an opportunity to enhance understanding of the relationships between knowledge and research and critical actions related to FASD. First held in 1987, the conference brings together people passionate about this work in a stimulating environment where they can learn and forge new partnerships.

Objectives

  • consider the implication and potential application of emerging evidence-based, and cutting-edge research
  • expand and challenge their knowledge and understanding of hard science
  • explore different models of advanced practice from and across disciplines
  • engage in knowledge exchange and…

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New Zealand: Warning labels on alcohol containers highly deficient, new research shows

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

warninglabelComparison of warning labels, from left to right: current “pea-sized” pregnancy warning labels (NZ beer can and NZ bottle), beer imported into NZ from Canada with much larger warning label (middle), mock-up of a warning label with more consumer information, and a current day NZ cigarette pack with a large pictorial warning. Credit: University of Otago

Current health warning labels on alcohol beverage containers in New Zealand are highly deficient, new research from the University of Otago, Wellington shows.

The researchers suggest that current voluntary labelling has not worked in New Zealand and mandatory standardised labelling which outlines major alcohol-related risks including pregnancy, drink-driving and cancer, are probably required.

The study found a total absence of any labels on some containers, on others there were “pea-size” pregnancy warnings, and there was a lack of detail generally about health risks, for example only 19 per cent warned about drink-driving.

The…

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The Prevention Conversation: An online curriculum

The Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility Project

cropped-letstalk3-1.jpgcropped-letstalk1-121.jpgThe Prevention Conversation is an online training program for front-line health and social services professionals to provide them with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to engage their clients/patients in a supportive and non-judgmental conversation about alcohol use during pregnancy, its lasting effects on the developing child, and resources and supports available to women of childbearing age.

This course discusses FASD prevention by providing information about the risks of alcohol use during pregnancy as well as considerations to support women in a way that promotes healthy relationships with professionals and promotes safety and health in all facets of their lives.

By completing this training course, facilitators will:

  • Have an understanding of the FASD Prevention Conversation: A Shared Responsibility program; it’s history and evolution;
  • Understand the complex reasons why a woman may drink when pregnant and have the tools to support conversations with pregnant women;
  • Be able to apply and tailor the…

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